5a) About Us – Why and How?

TO LEARN ABOUT US, READ OUR BACK STORY. Summary: After working about 40 years in the print/publishing business, we can provide an adequate overview of the writing to publishing process – offering time and money-saving information for authors. So that’s what we are doing here. WHY WE’RE DOING THIS We believe you deserve a clear understanding of what’s

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2a) PUBLISH – Rejections from Publishers and Agents

Join the club! Some publishers’ editors might make comments to help you improve your work when they reject. It’s a compliment that they took the time to respond. Who’d bother to take the time for someone who has absolutely no promise? Don’t despair – put it away and later, when you’re feeling better, get the

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2a) PUBLISH – Querying Publishers and Agents

There are different ways to approach an Agent, or Publisher depending on what type of writing you’re doing: magazine articles, non-fiction, fiction, Young Adult, Novels, etc. Some will ask for a synopsis of your work, and/or a sample of a chapter (pick your best if you’re allowed). Others might accept your proposal for a future

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2a) PUBLISH – Publisher Acceptance

Wahoo! Do celebrate! Then take time to sit with a lawyer who works with publishing contracts, or your agent who can help advocate for you. You can be fairly sure that this first contract offered is set up to benefit the publisher, and doesn’t consider you much. Before signing (because you’re so happy!) verify that

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2a) PUBLISH – Selecting & Querying Publishers

Some publishers write that they accept unsolicited queries or manuscripts. You can get in touch with these directly. Some of the larger publishing houses are reluctant to consider submissions that have not reached them through a literary agent. But many smaller specialized houses accept queries. Don’t just focus on the larger ones. Check the copyright

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2a) PUBLISH – Agents – Selecting & Querying

 Locating Agents Check the “acknowledgements” pages of books in your genre,  on bookstore or library shelves. If the author has a good relationship with their agent they usually mention them here. Write down the names, and consider contacting them. You already know  they’ve pleased some of their authors, and have at least one successful book

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2c) PUBLISH – Subsidy Publishing

  Vanity or  Subsidy Publishers Any publisher that charges the author to print, copy and supply their book to the market is a Subsidy Publisher. Some may say that you have to submit your manuscript for approval, but most accept anything you submit without looking it over. Some are disguised as “Educational” (University Presses) publishers, and

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2a) PUBLISH – Educational to Tiny Publishers

Educational Presses Some colleges have created their own publishing services for their faculty’s research publications.  Over the years some have expanded to publishing other informative books not necessarily from their own organization. These publishers can be quite large, and may be an option for your work.  If you see a publication on the same (or similar)

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2d) PUBLISH – Medium to Small Publishers – Pros, Cons & Bewares

Medium to Small Publishing Houses       Pros:  Bragging rights. Still quite an accomplishment – to contract with ANY traditional publisher. Small publishing houses obviously don’t have as many books in their catalog so they should be able to provide each author a little more attention. This can be really helpful to new authors

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2a) PUBLISH – Medium-Sized Publishers

Medium-Sized Publishers Medium-sized publishers have a catalog of about 50-100 books. Many have a salesperson, or share a salesperson with other medium sized presses. Some publishers in these catagories might even share their catalog printing with others so there’s more selection which yields a more impressive catalog. Catalogs usually go out three times a year.

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2d) PUBLISH – Large Publishers – Pros, Cons & Bewares

Large Company Publishing Pros: Bragging rights. For some authors, this is enough reason to work to land a contract with a large publishing house, even without much income. Support.  Professional experienced help with design and decisions such as title, cover, editing, etc. Advances and/or royalties. A new untested author may  get a few thousand dollars

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2a) PUBLISH – How the Money Works With Traditional Publishers

THE MONEY Large publishers almost always pay an advance. Medium sized publishers may pay an advance; but they may also just offer royalties as the books sell. Smaller publishers usually only offer a royalty percentage. This is legitimate. But these REAL publishers NEVER ask you for money up front to publish your book. This is

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1d) Edit – Editors’ Marks

Familiarize yourself with traditional editors’ marks. Your professionally edited pages will contain them. Line editing is a check for spelling, grammar, and sentence consistency. A complete edit will include fact-checking, date-checking, and questioning any claims you make for references to back them up. Practice using these symbols, even on your own proofs. It saves trying to remember what your random

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